UCI researchers reveal how two components of the Mallotus leaf extract bind to a previously unrecognized binding site on KCNQ1, a potassium channel essential for controlling electrical activity in many human organs, including the heart, kidneys, gastrointestinal tract, thyroid and pancreas. This computer model illustrates the novel herbal component, CPT1, an isovaleric acid molecule (green), occupying a novel binding site (R243, red) to activate KCNQ1. Credit: UCI School of Medicine/Geoff Abbott
Researchers in the Department of Physiology & Biophysics at the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine have discovered the molecular basis for therapeutic actions of an African folk medicine used to treat a variety...
Even mild physical activity immediately improves memory function
People who include a little yoga or tai chi in their day may be more likely to remember where they put their keys. Researchers at the University of California, Irvine and Japan's University of Tsukuba...
Deaths due to tainted herbal medicine under-recorded
A University of Adelaide forensic pathologist is warning that potentially harmful substances found in herbal medicines may be playing a bigger role in deaths of 'health tourists' than previously thought. Professor Roger Byard is calling for...
Restoring communication. Two participants in the BrainGate clinical trial directly control a tablet computer through a brain-computer interface to chat with each other online. The research, published in PLOS ONE, is a step toward restoring the ability of people with paralysis to use everyday technologies. Credit: BrainGate Collaboration
Tablets and other mobile computing devices are part of everyday life, but using them can be difficult for people with paralysis. New research from the BrainGate* consortium shows that a brain-computer interface (BCI) can enable...
When storing memories, brain prioritizes those experiences that are most rewarding
The brain's ability to preserve memories lies at the heart of our basic human experience. But how does the brain's mechanism for memory make sure we remember the most significant events and not clog our...
Orca. Credit: © MarkFineIMages / Fotolia
Killer whales display personality traits similar to those of humans and chimpanzees, such as playfulness, cheerfulness and affection, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. Researchers in Spain analyzed the personality traits of...
How your moving brain sees the world
What we see is not only determined by what is really there, but also depends on whether we are paying attention, whether we are moving, excited or interested. In a new study published in Nature...
Researchers have reproduced a brain-like behaviour by growing neurons on a pattern divided into four modules connected by tracks. Credit: Universitat de Barcelona / Tohoku University
One of the most important and surprising traits of the brain is its ability to reconfigure dynamically the connections to process and respond properly to stimuli. Researchers from Tohoku University (Sendai, Japan) and the University...
Time concept (stock illustration). Credit: © spaxiax / Fotolia
That moment when you step on the gas pedal a split second before the light changes, or when you tap your toes even before the first piano note of Camila Cabello's "Havana" is struck. That's...
People with heightened ability to detect coffee's bitterness learn to associate good things with it. Credit: © WavebreakmediaMicro / Fotolia
Why do we like the bitter taste of coffee? Bitterness evolved as a natural warning system to protect the body from harmful substances. By evolutionary logic, we should want to spit it out. But, it turns...