The IgM antibody has multiple arms to catch the virus, making it more efficient in clumping up the virus and keeping it from passing through the mucosal barrier and entering the rest of the body. Credit: Graphic artwork: Chris Wager
A group of scientists at Texas Biomedical Research Institute have zeroed in on a new defense against HIV-1, the virus that causes AIDS. Led by Ruth Ruprecht, M.D., Ph.D., the team used an animal model...
HIV particles (electron microscopy). Credit: © CDC/A.Harrison; Dr. P. Feorino
A new generation of broadly neutralising antibodies provides a novel approach to treating HIV infection. The research group of Prof Florian Klein, Director of the Institute of Virology at the University Hospital Cologne and scientist...
Pancreatic cancer cells deficient in the expression of the human gene known as Schlafen 11 and resistant to chemotherapy (left panels) were re-sensitized to chemotherapeutic treatment (middle and right panels) by inhibiting the expression of the transfer RNA known as tRNA-Leu-TAA through specially designed antisense oligonucleotides. Credit: Manqing Li, Michael David Lab, UC San Diego
DNA-damaging agents, or "DDAs," make up the most widely used group of cancer drugs. Yet their therapeutic success has been curtailed by drug resistance -- either present in cancer cells from the disease onset or...
Long-term study shows that HIV-2 is deadlier than previously thought
A study published in The Lancet HIV shows that HIV-2 is more pathogenic than previously demonstrated. The new findings indicate that early treatment should be applied to all patients with HIV, not only to those...
Cellphone technology developed to detect HIV
The management of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV), which cripples the immune system by attacking healthy cells, remains a major global health challenge in developing countries that lack infrastructure and trained medical professionals. Investigators from...
Majority of HIV persistence during ART due to infected cell proliferation
A majority of the HIV-infected cells that persist in HIV-infected individuals even during suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) originated from cellular proliferation, not viral replication, according to new research published in Nature Communications. Reducing the population size...
A structural model of viperin a naturally occurring enzyme in humans that is known to have antiviral effects on viruses such as West Nile, hepatitis C, rabies, and HIV. A new study led by researchers from Penn State and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine reveals the mode of action of viperin, which facilitates an important reaction that results in the production of ddhCTP, a molecule that prevents viruses from copying their genetic material. Credit: David W. Gohara, Ph.D
The newest antiviral drugs could take advantage of a compound made not by humans, but inside them. A team of researchers has identified the mode of action of viperin, a naturally occurring enzyme in humans...
UD Professor Juan Perilla (left) and doctoral student Chaoyi Xu examine the structure of the HIV virus, using both a physical and a computer-generated model. Credit: Evan Krape
Research by a multi-institutional team, including two members from the University of Delaware, has revealed new details about the HIV virus capsid structure and how it develops. A capsid is a protein shell that encloses a...
Gold element in periodic table. Credit: © andriano_cz / Adobe Stock
Scientists at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center took a step toward making gene therapy more practical by simplifying the way gene-editing instructions are delivered to cells. Using a gold nanoparticle instead of an inactivated virus,...
Microscopic image of an HIV-infected T cell. Credit: NIAID
Regular infusions of an antibody that blocks the HIV binding site on human immune cells may have suppressed levels of HIV for up to four months in people undergoing a short-term pause in their antiretroviral...