Camellia sinensis shrub. Credit: LiZhi Gao Lab
The most popular varieties of tea -- including black tea, green tea, Oolong tea, white tea, and chai -- all come from the leaves of the evergreen shrub Camellia sinensis, otherwise known as the tea...
Fruit fly (stock image). Credit: © Sebastian / Fotolia
You are what you eat. Or so the saying goes. Science now tells us that we are what the bacteria living in our intestinal tract eat and this could have an influence on how well...
Can chocolate, tea, coffee and zinc help make you more healthy?
Ageing and a low life expectancy are caused, at least partly, by oxidative stress. A team of researchers led by Prof. Dr. Ivana Ivanovi-Burmazovi from the Chair of Bioinorganic Chemistry at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), together...
Potential antidote to botulism
Researchers have identified a compound that strongly inhibits botulinum neurotoxin, the most toxic compound known. That inhibiting compound, nitrophenyl psoralen (NPP), could be used as a treatment to reduce paralysis induced by botulism. Botulinum neurotoxin...
A common fern leaf. Credit: University of York
The remains of a medieval skeleton has shown the first physical evidence that a fern plant could have been used for medicinal purposes in cases such as alopecia, dandruff and kidney stones. The skeleton of a...
UCI researchers reveal how two components of the Mallotus leaf extract bind to a previously unrecognized binding site on KCNQ1, a potassium channel essential for controlling electrical activity in many human organs, including the heart, kidneys, gastrointestinal tract, thyroid and pancreas. This computer model illustrates the novel herbal component, CPT1, an isovaleric acid molecule (green), occupying a novel binding site (R243, red) to activate KCNQ1. Credit: UCI School of Medicine/Geoff Abbott
Researchers in the Department of Physiology & Biophysics at the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine have discovered the molecular basis for therapeutic actions of an African folk medicine used to treat a variety...
Deaths due to tainted herbal medicine under-recorded
A University of Adelaide forensic pathologist is warning that potentially harmful substances found in herbal medicines may be playing a bigger role in deaths of 'health tourists' than previously thought. Professor Roger Byard is calling for...
Lab mouse. (stock image) Credit: © HYUNGKEUN / Fotolia
To the great surprise of cancer researchers, a protein they investigated for its possible role in cancer turned out to be a powerful regulator of metabolism. The Georgetown University-led study found that forced expression of...
A structural model of viperin a naturally occurring enzyme in humans that is known to have antiviral effects on viruses such as West Nile, hepatitis C, rabies, and HIV. A new study led by researchers from Penn State and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine reveals the mode of action of viperin, which facilitates an important reaction that results in the production of ddhCTP, a molecule that prevents viruses from copying their genetic material. Credit: David W. Gohara, Ph.D
The newest antiviral drugs could take advantage of a compound made not by humans, but inside them. A team of researchers has identified the mode of action of viperin, a naturally occurring enzyme in humans...
This image shows mound fields. The mounds are found in dense, low, dry forest caatinga vegetation and can be seen when the land is cleared for pasture. Credit: Roy Funch
Researchers reporting in Current Biology on November 19 have found that a vast array of regularly spaced, still-inhabited termite mounds in northeastern Brazil -- covering an area the size of Great Britain -- are up...