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Eocene shark teeth from northwestern Madagascar. Credit: Samonds et al, 2019
Eocene-aged sediments of Madagascar contain a previously unknown fauna of sharks and rays, according to a study released February 27, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Karen Samonds of Northern Illinois University and colleagues. This newly-described fauna is the first report of sharks and rays of this age in Madagascar. The Mahajanga basin of northwestern Madagascar yields abundant...
In the image, a flexible membrane (gray square) serves as an acoustic resonator, placed between two mirrors. When laser light is trapped between the mirrors, it passes repeatedly through the membrane. The force exerted by the laser light is used to control the membrane's vibrations. Credit: Harris Lab/Yale University
Imagine being able to hear people whispering in the next room, while the raucous party in your own room is inaudible to the whisperers. Yale researchers have found a way to do just that -- make sound flow in one direction -- within a fundamental technology found in everything from cell phones to gravitational wave detectors. What's more, the researchers...

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New study targets Achilles’ heel of pancreatic cancer, with promising results

Advanced pancreatic cancer is often symptomless, leading to late diagnosis only after metastases have spread throughout the body. Additionally, tumor cells...

Global warming disrupts recovery of coral reefs

The damage caused to the Great Barrier Reef by global warming has compromised the capacity of its corals to recover, according...
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Alzheimer's definition (stock image). Credit: © Feng Yu / Fotolia
Low levels of amyloid-β and tau proteins, biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD), in eye fluid were significantly associated with low cognitive scores, according to a new study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. Led...
UCI researchers reveal how two components of the Mallotus leaf extract bind to a previously unrecognized binding site on KCNQ1, a potassium channel essential for controlling electrical activity in many human organs, including the heart, kidneys, gastrointestinal tract, thyroid and pancreas. This computer model illustrates the novel herbal component, CPT1, an isovaleric acid molecule (green), occupying a novel binding site (R243, red) to activate KCNQ1. Credit: UCI School of Medicine/Geoff Abbott
Researchers in the Department of Physiology & Biophysics at the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine have discovered the molecular basis for therapeutic actions of an African folk medicine used to treat a variety...
Bacteria change behavior to tackle tiny obstacle course
It's not exactly the set of TV's "American Ninja Warrior," but a tiny obstacle course for bacteria has shown researchers how E. coli changes its behavior to rapidly clear obstructions to food. Their work holds...

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